Ila Safaris introduces Power walk

power walks ila lodge

We’re eager to share that we have a new walking safari track for our guests. We now offer a long-distance 20 kilometer ‘power-walk’ where you can really work on your fitness, whilst discovering the beautiful terrains and encounter the fantastic diversity of wildlife in the Kafue.

We’re also delighted to announce we’ve tested our brand new eQuadbike at Kaya Mawa. In sync with our eLandy and eBoat at Ila, we are about to start offering silent & eco-friendly quad biking safaris around Likoma island.

We’re delighted to introduce Cederic Gourmelen, our new Diving instructor at Kaya Mawa. Here is a little introduction written by Cederic himself:

“My name is Cedric Gourmelen. I am from Western France and have been a professional diver and instructor in the seas of the world for the last thirty years from Alaska to the Galapagos, from the great lagoons of Baya California to the Belizean cays, from the dark Scottish lakes to the ice carved floods of Iceland, from the lost coast of Burma to the reefs of Papa New Guinea, from Western Australia to the Southern tip of New Zealand, from Cape Town to Zanzibar, from the blues of Greek isles to the colours of the Red Sea…….following and studying the whales along the way. I first came to Malawi in the late 80’s, to now  return to teach and guide visitors, showing them the wonders of life in the great lake of Malawi, whilst obtaining their diving-license or expanding it to the next level.

Read More

Liuwa Plains’ Mindblowing Wildebeest migration

WESTERN Province, best known as home of the prestigious Kuomboka ceremony of the Lozi speaking people, is endowed with a number of tourist sites that offer a captivating tourism experience.
From the beautiful Barotse Plains in Mongu, which are a marvel to look at, especially around April when they filled with water, to the natural phenomena in Liuwa Plains National Park in Kalabo district.
But one which seems to be a seasonal marvel is the wildebeest migration, which is actually Africa’s second largest migration after the Masai Mara-Serengeti trek in Kenya.

The park, which covers 3, 660 square kilometres, is home to the wildebeest migration that has continued to attract both local and foreign tourists over the years. In 2000, the natural phenomena recorded only 50 tourists but with the construction of the Mongu-Kalabo road and the introduction of Proflight into Kalabo, the spectacle of Mother Nature has seen the numbers increase over the years. At the beginning of the rain season every year in Zambia, herds of blue wildebeests arrive at the Liuwa Plain National Park in thousands to seek fresh grazing in the remote sublime Liuwa Plains. The migration starts in early July when the wildebeests move north towards greener grazing pastures and when rains build up in early October, they head southwards.

Some of the wildlife one expects to see during this period include zebras, red lechwes, duikers and roan antelopes. Predators such as wild dogs, lions, hyenas, leopards, jackals and wildcats can also be spotted as they target antelopes. The birdlife in Liuwa is also excellent with over 300 species recorded in the area.
And as the wildebeests gather on the ground, the birds provide yet another exciting migration in the skies, a spectacle that provides a refreshing lifetime experience.
A local tourist, Mukeya Liwena, who is a regular visitor to the park, says the best time to see the migration is late November just before heavy rains arrive. Mr Liwena says the scenery creates an exclusive glimpsing and safari experience. He has since called on Zambians to take time and visit Liuwa Plains for an unforgettable experience.
‘‘Seeing thousands of wildebeests moving and running around in open park evokes imaginations of how it was in pre-historic times. Liuwa is so refreshing especially to those who are busy with work, that’s why it’s important to take some time off and go and connect oneself with nature,’’ he says.
Mr Liwena says his attention on his first visit was caught by how human and animals are living in the park with no human-animal conflicts.

Liuwa Plains, a large grassy plain and woodland area, is home to a multitude of large mammals and over 300 bird species. The park at one time was home to a lone lioness which was nickednamed Lady Liuwa. The only surviving of its kind, Lady Liuwa survived the cruel hand of poachers who killed a massive number of lions over years in illegal trophy hunting acts. According to the World Wild Fund (WWF), Zambia social media posting, the lioness, which was first spotted in 2000, loomed the park in isolation. Her separation from her kind drew her closer to humans in such a way that she was considered part of the conservation family. Lady Liuwa, unfortunately died in August 2017 from natural causes aged between 17-19. The Liuwa Plain National Park was proclaimed a game reserve in the 1880s by then king of Barotseland, Lewanika in whose name a lodge has been erected at the heart of the park. It was established as a national park in 1972. It is run by African Parks with the support of the Department of National Parks and the Barotse Royal Establishment.

-DailyMail

Read More

Kansaka Bat Migration

Kansaka Bat Migration, Bat Migration, zambia bat migration

Every day up to 12 million of the winged creatures flock from all over sub-Saharan Africa to roost in Zambia. The bat migration takes place between mid-October and early December and is the largest mammal migration in the world. The straw-coloured fruit bats, which can have a wingspan of up to one metre, head to country’s protected Kasanka National Park to gorge themselves on the abundant fruit.

The bats, weighing just 300g each, roost in such large groups that often they cause whole trees to collapse. Bat expert Dr Rachael Cooper-Bohannon, 37, said: “What makes it so unique is that they are migrating to eat. “A lot of times animals might migrate to breed, but these bats are doing it to feed, which is very rare.”

The bats eat wild fruit like musuku, mufinsa and water berries, which grow in Kasanka in abundance. The real spectacle occurs at dusk and dawn. Scout bats are sent out first, but as night begins to fall, the entire colony sets out on a search for food. Dr Cooper-Bohannon, a conservation biologist at Bats Without Borders, said: “Scout bats go and suss out the food and make sure the conditions are right before the whole flock sets out.

“Bats are very clever animals and really quite social. We can hear their clicks and squeaks, which is their chit-chat. They are also able to migrate from memory.”

For more than half an hour, the sky is filled with bats flying out in all directions. Their quest lasts all night, and they return to roost in the same mass at dawn, though stragglers will arrive for an hour after sunrise. The foraging animals can cover as much as 100km in a night in their search for tasty fruits. Straw-coloured fruit bats are the most common fruit bat species in Africa, but their numbers have declined in the last 20 years.

Dr Cooper-Bohannon said: “Bat numbers are hurt by land degradation caused by humans, and also persecution. People are scared of bats, as they are concerned that they can carry ebola. They are also eaten in central Africa, as part of the bush meat trade.”

In Kasanka, however, the bats are protected by eco-tourism, with spectators travelling from all over the world to witness the fascinating migration from special viewing platforms.

Source: Barcroft tv

Read More

Zimbabwe Tourism Expo Promises

Read More

National Game Parks discover rare leopard

Read More

Livingstone Resorts Specials

Read More

Gathered was divide second

Duis mollis, est non commodo luctus, nisi erat porttitor ligula, eget lacinia odio sem nec elit. Integer posuere erat a ante venenatis dapibus posuere velit aliquet. Donec ullamcorper nulla non metus auctor fringilla.

Nunc blandit tincidunt consequat. Duis diam metus, suscipit in pulvinar eget, egestas id arcu. Duis a enim vel mauris ultrices. Nullam aliquet velit ac velit tempus in semper neque auctor. Aenean ligula mi, auctor sed tempus ultrices, semper tempus diam.

Etiam pellentesque, suscipit in pulvinar eget placerat, leo leo consequat ante, non iaculis turpis augue ac ligula. Nunc blandit tincidunt consequat. Duis diam metus, suscipit in pulvinar eget, egestas id arcu. Duis a enim vel mauris ultrices. Nullam aliquet velit ac velit tempus in semper neque auctor. Aenean ligula mi, auctor sed tempus ultrices, semper tempus diam.

Read More

Created lights whose days

Duis mollis, est non commodo luctus, nisi erat porttitor ligula, eget lacinia odio sem nec elit. Integer posuere erat a ante venenatis dapibus posuere velit aliquet. Donec ullamcorper nulla non metus auctor fringilla.

Nunc blandit tincidunt consequat. Duis diam metus, suscipit in pulvinar eget, egestas id arcu. Duis a enim vel mauris ultrices. Nullam aliquet velit ac velit tempus in semper neque auctor. Aenean ligula mi, auctor sed tempus ultrices, semper tempus diam.

Etiam pellentesque, suscipit in pulvinar eget placerat, leo leo consequat ante, non iaculis turpis augue ac ligula. Nunc blandit tincidunt consequat. Duis diam metus, suscipit in pulvinar eget, egestas id arcu. Duis a enim vel mauris ultrices. Nullam aliquet velit ac velit tempus in semper neque auctor. Aenean ligula mi, auctor sed tempus ultrices, semper tempus diam.

Read More